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Residential Services

1. WALLS

2. AIR SEALING

3. FOUNDATIONS

4. CEILING

5. INSULATIONS

Commercial Services

1. ROOFING

2. WALLS

3. AIR SEALING

4. STORAGE AND SPECIALTY COATINGS

Residential Services

1. Walls.

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that up to 40 percent of the cost of heating and cooling a home is lost to uncontrolled air leakage. When air leaves the house, it takes moisture and pollutants along for the ride, contributing to premature deterioration, ice damming, mold and mildew and poor indoor air quality. When unconditioned air enters the home, it increases thermal discomfort and makes the indoor environment hard to control. Continuous air barrier systems improve energy efficiency by keeping conditioned air inside the house where it belongs. By controlling air movement with planned ventilation, you’ll get a reduction in moisture, condensation, mold and mildew. Homes built to the American Lung Association® Health House® guidelines are constructed airtight to improve energy efficiency and prevent unplanned moisture movement.

 

2. Air Sealing.

Stop costly uncontrolled air leakage by sealing gaps, cracks and holes in the building envelope. Improve energy efficiency and durability. Reduce tenant complaints by providing a safer, healthier, more comfortable indoor environment. “Sealing those air leaks will help you maintain your home at a comfortable temperature all year long and help lower energy bills. The biggest holes are most often found in the attic and the basement.” – Excerpt from ENERGY STAR®, Frequently Asked Questions About Air Sealing. Insulate ‘hard-to-build’ areas Two-component polyurethane insulating air sealants and one-component polyurethane foam sealants are installed from within the building structure to seal and insulate ‘hard-to-build’ areas, such as windows, doors, penetrations, parapets and soffits to create insulating air barrier system continuity from the foundation up through the walls and across the roof. Click here to request further information New construction or retrofit, insulating air sealants contribute to: Improved energy efficiency Reduced moisture transmission Reduced chance of mold and mildew growth Reduced ice damming.

 

3. Foundations.

According to the United States Department of Energy, 20% of energy loss in residential structures can be attributed to insulated foundations. The use of closed-cell, spray-applied polyurethane foam under slab and on the exterior of foundation walls adds thermal protection and moisture management to the structure without reducing the useable space within the basement. Eliminate cracking, shrinkage and moisture problems Below slab: Addresses soil gas migration Provides a stable substrate for concrete Creates slope-to-drain aspect to the substrate Reduces need for excessive thickness of concrete to provide drainage Fast and design friendly Direct to the cured block, or poured concrete foundation walls: Provides a fully-adhered, monolithic layer of insulation on the outside of the foundation Engineered to withstand hydrostatic head pressures of typical backfill and water tables Creates an effective, insulated moisture management system.

 

4. Ceiling.

It’s the basic physics lesson: hot air rises. In hot climates, this phenomenon can make summer living on upper floors almost unbearable. When HVAC equipment is located in the attic, it can also mean inflated energy bills. In cold climates, warm, moist air from the living space of the house travels upwards through gaps, cracks and holes into the unconditioned attic space. There, it meets cold air and even colder surfaces where it condenses, causing premature building deterioration, mold and rot. Those giant icicles? They’re not pretty. They can be dangerous. And they indicate a serious problem with ceiling and attic air seal and insulation. How? Warm attics also melt the bottom layer of snow on the roof and the water runs down to the gutter where it refreezes. Shingles get lifted. Icicles break and eaves fall off posing a risk to occupants and guests. Energy is wasted. Stop uncontrolled air leakage Click here to request further information Closed-cell, spray-applied polyurethane foam insulation in the attic or on the ceiling stops uncontrolled air leakage to give you control over indoor temperatures, eliminate ice damming and keep energy costs under control. Self-adhering, closed-cell polyurethane foam conforms to any shape, will not shrink or sag over time, and creates a seamless, air- and water-impermeable barrier that separates conditioned living space from unconditioned attic. In cathedral ceiling applications, polyurethane foam does not promote deterioration of the existing roof sheathing, because it does not allow condensation at the foam/deck interface. Some traditional insulation systems have high water absorption, and hold moisture against the underside of the sheathing. Closed-cell foam insulation can be applied without roof ventilation, because it is fully adhered and air impermeable. Moisture does not condense between the insulation and the sheathing.

 

5. Insulations.

Insulation. Air leakage control. Structural strength. Flood resistance. This isn’t your grandfather’s insulation. Combining a superior insulation R-value with near-zero air permeability, closed-cell, spray-applied polyurethane foam increases energy efficiency and occupant comfort and improves indoor air quality. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) reports that up to 40% of the cost of heating and cooling a home is lost to uncontrolled air leakage. Closed-cell polyurethane foam insulation has been tested and is certified to be an air barrier at an application of 1-inch thickness. It is fully-adhered and does not allow air to flow around, behind or through the insulation system. The DOE has also shown that 15% of traditional insulation materials’ effectiveness is lost due to convection loops through and behind board and batt systems. Polyurethane technology eliminates this by forming a fully adhered, seamless insulation and air barrier system. Increased structural integrity, reduced mold Spray-applied closed-cell polyurethane foam is the only insulation material proven to add structural integrity throughout the wall system, according to the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) Research Center. Tests conducted there show spray foam insulation between wood- and steel-stud wall panels increased rack and shear strength two to three times compared with standard stick-built components with glass fiber insulation. In addition to rack and shear, closed-cell polyurethane foam is classified as an acceptable flood-resistant material by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Mold requires three things to grow: moisture, warm temperatures and a food source. Polyurethane foam insulation eliminates condensing surfaces, reduces the potential to accumulate moisture, has no nutritional value and is not considered a food source for mold.


 

Commercial Buildings:

1. Roofing

  • Lowest Cost Re-Roofing
  • 95% of the Time
  • Highest performance all the time

Imagine a roofing system that provides more than 20 years of leak-free performance with little-to-no maintenance. Imagine that same roof giving you improved building energy efficiency, the industry’s best severe weather resistance and the lowest lifecycle cost.
Now imagine installing it directly over your existing roof – saving labor, hassle, disposal costs and the environment all at once. Low lifecycle cost, Low-maintenance, leak-free, and Energy efficient. Studies conducted by Structural Research Inc. for the National Roofing Foundation, Texas A&M University, Michelsen Technologies, LLC and the National Roofing Contractors Association show that SPF roofing systems:

  • Offer the lowest lifecycle cost
  • Provide 20 to 30 years of low-maintenance, leak-free performance
  • Install directly to existing substrate in almost all retrofit situations, reducing costs and landfill waste
  • Improve building energy efficiency through superior insulation properties and elimination of thermal bridging
  • Provide the highest wind uplift and severe hail resistance in the industry
  • Are sustainable through recoatin

2.Walls

Building scientists agree – you need an air barrier to make a building truly energy efficient. That’s because up to 40 percent of conditioned air escapes through the cracks, gaps and holes that exist in the envelope of the average American building. When air leaves the building, it takes moisture and pollutants along for the ride, contributing to premature deterioration, mold and mildew. Reduce air leakage by up to 83 percent. A study from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) shows continuous air barrier systems reduce air leakage by up to 83 percent, for potential gas savings of greater than 40 percent and electrical savings greater than 25 percent.

To meet these standards, an air barrier system must:

  • Have an air permeance rating less than 0.004 cfm/ft2
  • Be continuous throughout the building envelope
  • Have interconnected, flexible joints
  • Be able to withstand positive and negative wind pressures without displacement
  • Be durable enough to last the life of the building .

3. Air Sealing

Stop costly uncontrolled air leakage by sealing gaps, cracks and holes in the building envelope with BASF Foam Sealants. Improve energy efficiency and durability. Reduce tenant complaints by providing a safer, healthier, more comfortable indoor environment.

“Despite common assumptions that envelope air leakage is not significant in office and other commercial buildings, measurements have shown that these buildings are subject to larger infiltration rates than commonly believed. Infiltration in commercial buildings can have many negative consequences, including reduced thermal comfort, interference with the proper operation of mechanical ventilation systems, degraded indoor air quality, moisture damage of building envelope components and increased energy consumption.” — Excerpt from the 2005 National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) report, Investigation of the Impact of Commercial Building Envelope Airtightness on HVAC Energy Use.

Insulate ‘hard-to-build’ areas. Two-component polyurethane insulating air sealants and one-component polyurethane foam sealants are installed from within the building structure to seal and insulate ‘hard-to-build’ areas, such as windows, doors, penetrations, parapets and soffits to create insulating air barrier system continuity from the foundation up through the walls and across the roof.

New construction or retrofit, insulating air sealants contribute to:

  • Improved energy efficiency
  • Reduced moisture transmission
  • Reduced chance of mold and mildew growth
  • Improved smoke control in emergencies.

4. Storage and Specialty Coatings

Industrial storage containers need protection from the elements – and from their contents.

Whether you have storage tanks and vessels at LNG terminals, chemical and process plants, waste water treatment facilities or pulp and paper mills, you can protect your investment – and your product.

Durable, flexible, and resistant
Polyurea elastomeric protective coatings and linings are spray-applied, custom-engineered coatings designed to deliver superior durability, flexibility, corrosion, abrasion, weather and chemical resistance.

Do you need to maintain temperature control and/or viscosity levels of chemicals and other liquids? Spray-applied polyurethane foam insulation for storage tanks is a versatile, easy-to-use and economical option for storage vessels in industrial and commercial applications.